Eric Meyer blogs at http://www.meyerweb.com/ xml

Google's statistics on most-used HTML tags and classes

25/01/2006 @ 09:08 UTC

Milo Vermeulen : Google's statistics on most-used HTML tags and classes [via]

Andy Baio : Google Code's Web Authoring Statistics - popular elements and attributes across a billion webpage sample set  [via]

Nelson Minar : Web authoring stats - Google's analysis of 1 billion web pages' HTML

Eric Meyer : Google Code: Web Authoring Statistics - "In December 2005 we did an analysis of a sample of slightly over a billion documents, extracting information about popular class names, elements, attributes, and related metadata."

kayodeok : Google Code: Web Authoring Statistics - In December 2005 we did an analysis of a sample of slightly over a billion documents, extracting information about popular class names, elements, attributes, and related metadata. The results we found are available below. We hope this is of use!

Jeremy Zawodny : Web Authoring Statistics - Web Authoring Statistics: interesting google stats on web page elements and such

François Nonnenmacher : Google Code: Web Authoring Statistics - View this with Firefox or an SVG-enabled browser

Paul Hammond : Google Code: Web Authoring Statistics - analysis of a sample of slightly over a billion documents

Richard Rutter : Web Authoring Statistics - Google investigates the popularity of classes, elements, etc.

ALA: Web 3.0

17/01/2006 @ 19:09 UTC

Cameron Moll : ALA: Web 3.0 - A List Apart: "Web 3.0". Jeffrey speaks from the heart. At least that's how I read it. I found this to be highly motivational, surprisingly. "These problems and others will be solved, most likely by someone reading this page," says Zeldman. "One points to

Rod Begbie : A List Apart: Articles: Web 3.0 - I ♥ Zeldman. [via#

Eric Meyer : A List Apart: Articles: Web 3.0 - Preach on, brutha.

jimray : A List Apart: Articles: Web 3.0 - "My discomfort with the hype surrounding an emerging genre of web development turned into a full-blown hate-on." Zeldman debunks all the Web2.0 inanity.

Simon Willison : Web 3.0 - A Zeldman classic.

kayodeok : A List Apart: Articles: Web 3.0 - "We have been down this road before"

Jeremy Zawodny : Web 3.0 - Web 3.0: "But ours is a medium in which, more often than not, big teams have slowly and expensively labored to produce overly complex web applications whose usability was near nil on behalf of clients with at best vague goals."

WillPate : Web 3.0 - "To you who feel like failures because you spent last year honing your web skills and serving clients, or running a business, or perhaps publishing content, you are special and lovely, so hold that pretty head high, and never let them see the tears."

François Nonnenmacher : Web 3.0 - Jeffrey Zeldman cuts to the chase

Art. Lebedev - Optimus keyboard

14/07/2005 @ 14:55 UTC

Milo Vermeulen : Art. Lebedev - Optimus keyboard

gleuschk : awesome lcd keyboard - holy cow, now, *that's* the future

Andy Baio : Optimus keyboard - jaw-dropping keyboard concept with each key as an LCD display [via]  [via]

Rod Begbie : Optimus keyboard - Extremely kewl concept -- A keyboard with leds, so the key displays change depending on context. [via#

tehu : Optimus keyboard : LCD on your keys - Oh I want one ! Patents pending ? Gosh !

Matthew M. Boedicker : keyboard where each key is a mini LCD

jkottke : Whoa, each key on this keyboard is a little computer screen - I'd love to use the typeface of my choosing for my keyboard.

znarf : Art. Lebedev - Optimus keyboard - I want it ! [via#

plasticbag : The Optimus keyboard has a tiny screen under each key, so that you can remap it easily to any combination - Mr Webb informs me that each button costs tens of dollars at the moment, and as such it doesn't look likely to go on the market any time soon - but it rocks and I want one...

Eric Meyer : Optimus keyboard - Oh, that's just far too awesome. It would certainly make learning Dvorak (or playing games) a LOT easier. [via Dan] [via]

Simon Willison : Optimus keyboard - Every key is a colour screen.

Safari Passes the Acid2 Test

28/04/2005 @ 08:56 UTC

Anne van Kesteren : Safari Passes the Acid2 Test - Now that didn?t take long. #

Ethan Marcotte : Safari is the first to pass the Acid2 test - And he posts the KHTML patches to boot. What a rockstar, that Dave Hyatt.

François Nonnenmacher : Safari Passes the Acid2 Test - Kudos to Hyatt and Apple. Now the $64,000 question is: will IE7 pass it too?

kayodeok : Safari Passes the Acid2 Test

jimray : Safari passes Acid 2 - Safari's rendering engine is now the most standards compliant - uber l33t

Paul Hammond : Surfin' Safari - Safari Passes the Acid2 Test - There were two issues left that needed to be resolved

Simon Willison : Safari passes the Acid2 test - Dave Hyatt runs rings around the rest.

Eric Meyer : Safari Passes the Acid2 Test - Hyatt's da man.

Panic - The True Story of Audion

12/11/2004 @ 02:55 UTC

Rod Begbie : Panic - The True Story of Audion - Behind-the-scenes magic of a long-time Mac app. [via#

Eric Meyer : The True Story of Audion - The thrilling tale of two guys from Portland and the Mac software they created. Lengthy, but worth it. From the creators of Transmit, one of my must-have applications.

jkottke : The true story of Audion - An independent Mac software developer loving tells the story of the little MP3 player that could. Worth a read. (Comment on this)

deusx : Panic - Extras - The True Story of Audion - "Is it just me? I mean, do you ever wonder about the stories behind everyday products?" Great story. Click on the links.

Phil Gyford : Panic - Extras - The True Story of Audion - Cabel Sasser on the story of developing Audion and the emergence of iTunes. A long but great read.

Simon Willison : The True Story of Audion - A long but fascinating read. (via) [via]

Jon Hicks : The True Story of Audion - I know the would and his wife have linked to this, but it really is worth your time!

Jeremy Zawodny : The True Story of Audion - The True Story of Audion: It seems you can either be free to do anything you want, to create anything you dream of without answering to anyone, or you can be rich. You're not likely to be both.

XML on the Web Has Failed

22/07/2004 @ 01:56 UTC

Simon Willison : XML on the Web Has Failed - Mark Pilgrim concludes a theme he's been following for quite a while.

Anne van Kesteren : XML on the Web Has Failed - XML is not the only thing imo #

François Hodierne : XML.com: XML on the Web Has Failed [via#

Paul Hammond : XML.com: XML on the Web Has Failed - The entire world of syndication only works because everyone happens to ignore the rules in the same way

Philippe Janvier : XML on the Web Has Failed - When Content-type and Charset drives to ill-formeness :(

Mark Pilgrim : xml on the web has failed - well, we'll know better next time #

Kayode Okeyode : XML on the Web Has Failed

Richard MacManus : Mark Pilgrim: XML on the Web Has Failed - At least he didn't use the phrase "systemic anomaly".

Eric Meyer : XML on the Web Has Failed - Depressing, not least because it provides confirmation of a suspicion I've had for a while now but was trying to ignore.

when semantic markup goes bad

4/05/2004 @ 19:00 UTC

cobra libre : when semantic markup goes bad - i agree completely

Paul Hammond : Matthew Thomas - When semantic markup goes bad - This is why b and i exist

Philippe Janvier : When semantic markup goes bad - "In advanced speech browsers, for example, pages that use i when they mean cite will merely sound flat; but pages that use em when they mean cite will sound stupid."

Kayode Okeyode : When semantic markup goes bad

Simon Willison : When semantic markup goes bad - Matthew Thomas argues for and

Adam Gessaman : When semantic markup goes bad

Richard Rutter : When semantic markup goes bad - Always using strong instead of b is not necessarily a good thing (filed under Mark-up techniques). [via WaSP]

Eric Meyer : When semantic markup goes bad - Matthew Thomas beats me to the punch, and does a better job of it anyway.

xml
Upian.